#52filmsbywomen

#52FilmsByWomen

Every year I watch a lot of films, and go to the cinema quite often. Last year I saw 49 films that were released in 2019. I saw 126 films total when counting older films and re-watches. Late in 2018, I started making more of a conscious effort to seek out women-directed films. At the theater, I’d go out of my way to see them opening weekend and pick them over wide releases. I always go into a film knowing if it was directed, written, or produced by a woman. But this year I’d like to document it and make it more intentional. That’s where the #52FilmsByWomen comes in.

I’ve always been very tuned in to issues of representation and diversity, particularly around film (particularly animation of course). The abysmal stats of women in above-the-line roles as well as nearly every other role are not new to me. I’ve written a bit about it before, like when a rep from the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media visited the NYC chapter of Women in Animation. I was one of “those” women in the brainstorm and story rooms at Blue Sky questioning the women characters and/or lack of POC. It sucked being that person, but it seems like people are catching up…slowly.

The 52 Films By Women challenge is pretty self-explanatory: once a week for a year, watch a film directed by a woman. I plan on documenting it on my film/animation Twitter account, as well as my Letterboxd.

It’s fun to scroll through the hashtag on Twitter and see other people’s films and lists and recommendations too.

These are my own general guidelines:

  • directed by a woman or person identifying as a woman
  • can be co-directed by man
  • bonus points if written by a woman, but not the focus this year
  • feature films
  • short films
  • not too many re-watches
  • 500 word maximum post per film (around the length of this post, minus the film list below)

The main reason I’m allowing for a male co-director is because I don’t think I’d have much luck with animated features otherwise. 😑 And while I want to seek out new films, there are some I’ve seen that are worth re-watching or at least documenting on here as well.

So yes, there will be some posts on here about–gasp!–not animation! But if it gets me writing more and about film overall, it’s well worth it.

I’m excited to explore filmography I haven’t gotten around to, like Kathryn Bigelow and Agnes Varda, to dig around for the rare Criterion Collection gems, find some animated shorts. I want to find older films. I do want to re-watch some films too. The point’s to just watch films. There’s just so much out there…and yet…never enough.


THE 2020 LIST

  1. Little Women (2019) Greta Gerwig
  2. Can You Ever Forgive Me (2018) Marielle Heller
  3. Hail Satan? (2019) Penny Lane
  4. Mountain (2017) Jennifer Peedom
  5. Sister (2018) Siqi Song
  6. Dcera (2019) Daria Kashcheeva
  7. Kitbull (2019) Rosana Sullivan
  8. Henrietta Bulkowski (2019) Rachel Johnson
  9. The Bird and the Whale (2019) Carol Freeman
  10. Britannia (1993) Joanna Quinn
  11. St. Louis Superman (2019) Smriti Mundhra (& Sami Khan)
  12. Life Overtakes Me (2019) Kristine Samuelson (& John Haptas)
  13. Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl) (2019) Carol Dysinger
  14. Walk Run Cha-Cha (2019) Laura Nix
  15. Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2019) Cathy Yan
  16. Miss Americana (2019) Lana Wilson
  17. She Did That (2019?) Kirsten Magwood (& Sterling Milan)
  18. Loop (2020) Erica Milsom
  19. The Imagineering Story (2019) Leslie Iwerks
  20. Pretty Strong (2020) Colette McInerney, Julie Ellison, and Leslie Hittmeier
  21. Kung Fu Panda 2 (2011) Jennifer Yuh Nelson
  22. The Half of It (2020) Alice Wu
  23. Becoming (2020) Nadia Hallgreen
  24. Broken: Rock, Paper, Scissor (2014) Gang Maria Yi (& Garrett O’Neal & Bryan Locantore)
  25. Peter and the Wolf (2006) Suzie Templeton
  26. Le Clitoris (2016) Lori Malépart-Traversy
  27. The Watermelon Woman (1996) Cheryl Dunye

2 thoughts on “#52FilmsByWomen

  1. Oswald Iten says:

    Great challenge, hope you meet that goal and in turn inspire other people to discover female directors. Because in live-action (and animated short films) there is a lot to discover.

    Thanks for mentioning my blog so prominently in your resources section! I’ve only discovered that when I updated it (the first time after a year), because I was wondering if there is still some traffic on my almost abandoned blog. And then I found that some of it came from animationcomplex 🙂

    All the best
    Oswald

    • Jen says:

      Thank you so much for reaching out about that! Your site really was my intro to film school before I took any film classes. : ) I’m happy you still post some times!! And thank you for the well-wishes regarding this project. I’ve already seen more movies than I can keep up with on here, and it’s already brought me out of my comfort zone in terms of the usual films I gravitate towards.

      Hope you’re well,
      Jen

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